07 October 2015

Noise, Pt. 9 - Airs Oct 7th

Master and Servant from Noise: A Human History of Sound and Listening
Grand town houses in the eighteenth century seemed to promise privacy. But in fact they offered anything but – the family home often included not just parents and children, but also elderly relatives, unmarried sisters, paying lodgers, and the nosiest neighbors of the lot…the servants. Professor David Hendy of the University of Sussex eavesdrops on the whispers, gossip and scandal of the eighteenth century house, and tells the salacious tale of John Burt, a navy captain from Canterbury, who took his young wife Harriet to court for impropriety - on the evidence of his cook.  

Slavery and Rebellion from Noise: A Human History of Sound and Listening
Many slaves would have heard the sounds of home for the last time as they waited at Ghana’s Gate of No Return for a ship to the new world. Far away on the Carolina plantations they were expected to be quiet or to sing to demonstrate contentment with their lot. But in 1739, one of the largest and most violent revolts in American history took place – and for a brief time the slaves were anything but silent. Professor Hendy tells us the story of the Stono River revolt.

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