03 December 2014

Noise War - Airs Dec 3rd

Shell Shock from Noise: A Human History of Sound and Listening
The rumble of artillery bombardment in Northern France could be heard as far away as Kent during the First World War. Up close in the trenches soldiers experienced a sonic onslaught that continued night and day: howling shells, the machine gun’s rattle, and the screams of injured men. Professor Hendy of the University of Sussex visits Flanders to relay echoes from the Front. 

Radio Everywhere from Noise: A Human History of Sound and Listening
Radio seemed like magic to begin with... then the Nazis exploited its darker powersIn the early days, listening to radio was an uncanny, miraculous experience. Amazingly, voices arrived out of thin air from hundreds of miles away. In time, the radio became a trusted part of family life - and by the 1930s and 40s, it was the perfect medium for propaganda, as Joseph Goebbels recognized. In this thrilling chapter, we consider the seductive power of the disembodied voice. 

No comments: